Tuesday, March 01, 2011

Exchanging wood for lino

I have lots of ideas brewing for new engravings, but my stock of wood blocks is empty. And so is my piggy-bank at the moment, but I can't wait to get going again. I need to get some more, but in the meantime I have dug out a vintage set (unused!) of lino cutting tools that my mother passed to me and a piece of lino that has, frankly, seen better days. I can't be bothered to trail all the way to the nearest art or DIY shop just for that, so decide to go with the distressed look! What better excuse to freshen my artistic outlook with a 'bit of a play' with unfamiliar materials?

I haven't lino-printed since schooldays and I know that lino doesn't take fine cutting as well as endgrain wood, so no minute detailing then.  The lino tools felt clunky and clumsy, so I got out my engraving tools and they worked just as well and felt more comfortable to use. The lino itself is cutting a little crumblier than I hoped, probably to do with it's advanced years, but when I warm it up with the hairdrier, it's better.

I have had a sketch floating about for years, showing supporters at some unspecified ball game, caught at the point where their team scores a much-needed goal. I wanted to show that moment of sheer exultation (or disappointment for the scored-against).



The print-savvy will have noticed that in my eagerness to start, I failed to reverse the design onto the block, so it'll print the other way around. Sigh....... I don't think it'll really matters though.

6 comments:

Gretel said...

LOL, I did a little lino cut the other day and did exactly the same thing! :) I use a scalpel to cut my lino outlines really deep, though I do sometimes use a lino tool for clearing areas.

Ellen Shipley said...

Thanx for the tip about the hair dryer. I have lino that's been sitting around my studio for years. Nice to know I can still use it.

I'm forever forgetting to reverse an image. But I sure don't think it'll diminish your great image any.

Jan said...

The image itself is very lively and I'm sure will look great in reverse. I was interested to see that you cut away the excess lino at the top, I suppose this makes it easier to print?

Sue said...

Gretel: Great minds, and all that! LOL!

Ellen: I put the lino on a radiator, if the heating's on, too.

Jan:I cut the bit out at the top as I wanted it white and it saved having to carve all that lino away. :-)

sim only deals said...

Nice pics..

Diane Cutter said...

This is going to be a super print. I think you'll find that, if careful and not cutting to deep, you'll get more detail than expected from lino. I think the transfer back to lino after so much detailed work with wood will surprise you.

I like the idea of cutting away the upper area. Very sensible approach...